How To

How to Clean and Renovate a Used Model M Keyboard

We tracked down a massive terminal-style Model M, the ugliest and most abused we could find, and bought it for a fraction of the price of a mint condition keyboard.
What You’ll Need In order to restore an old model M keyboard, you’ll need a few things: A 7/32″ nut driver or equivalent: the bolts holding the plastic case of the Model M together are a very specific size, so specific that you might not have a driver or ratchet even if you have an expansive collection of tools.
Step Two: Remove the Keycaps Use your keycap tool to remove all the keycaps on the keyboard.
This can be a little less than 90 or, as in our particular model, over 120.
There’s a small plastic piece holding the data cable in place as it’s looped through the case (again, this design may vary on smaller Model M keyboards); remove it and put it in the same bowl as the keycaps, so that you can get a bit more give in the cable.
You should now have the following separate pieces: the data cable, the bottom half of the plastic shell, the top half, the steel plate, and all of your loose smaller pieces—the keycaps, space bar stabilizer, and the plastic retention clip.
Step Five: Clean the Keycaps If the keycaps you removed are dirty, this is going to take a long time.
(Don’t worry about flipping the plate over with the keycaps removed, the springs are attached directly to the switch mechanism and won’t fall out.)
That said, with a hundred or more plastic pieces in most Model M keyboards, it’s an intense and time-consuming process.
Once it’s in the correct place, you should be able to place the top shell above it with all of the key switches corresponding to the correct spaces in the shell.

How to Turn Your iPhone or iPad Into the Ultimate Gaming Machine

How to Turn Your iPhone or iPad Into the Ultimate Gaming Machine.
Gaming PCs are great, but sitting at a desk after an entire day of work isn’t the most comfortable thing in the world.
If you only think of phones and tablets as capable for silly, five-minute Angry Birds, you’re missing out.
Check out our list of the best high-quality mobile games to take your collection to the next level—and don’t forget to track the sales if you want to save a few bucks.
Thankfully, there are a few solid gamepads made for iPhone and iPad that work with a ton of games in the App Store.
To see which games are gamepad-compatible, check out this list at AfterPad.com.
Use a Good Pair of Headphones You probably use a gaming headset at your PC, and a nice set of speakers on your TV.
If you have a gaming PC with an NVIDIA graphics card, you can play just about any modern PC title right on your iPhone or iPad.
Yeah, seriously.
Moonlight even works with MFi gamepads, so it’s like having your own little NVIDIA SHIELD that runs iOS.

How to Empty the WordPress Trash Using a MySQL Query

How to Empty the WordPress Trash Using a MySQL Query.
Over on HTG main we’ve been working on cleaning things up after getting hit with an unexplained 35% drop in Google traffic, and as part of that process we’ve been deleting old posts that we don’t really want around anymore.
The problem is that once you delete hundreds or thousands of posts in WordPress, it’s basically impossible to empty the trash using the interface — it’ll take a few minutes and then time out without successfully emptying the trash.
Luckily there is always a better way… and in this case, it’s as simple as running a database script.
You can launch a MySQL console by running this command from the terminal, using the values from your wp-config.php file to connect to the database.
Maybe you should have a full backup of your website, right?
The DELETE part of the statement lists out the tables that we want to delete data from, and MySQL will delete all records in those tables that are matched by this query.
So, obviously, if you’re going to tweak this technique you should be realllllllly careful.
You could, of course, only delete the posts by using delete from wp_posts where post_status=’trash’ but that would leave all the meta around, which can be a ton of extra data.
You wouldn’t run random SQL on production in the middle of the day would you?

How to Set Apple Maps to Avoid Tolls and Highways

How to Set Apple Maps to Avoid Tolls and Highways.
If Apple Maps is your navigation tool of choice and you prefer avoiding toll roads, staying off the highways, or both, it’s easy to tweak Apple Maps to meet your needs.
Scroll down until you find the entry for “Maps” and select it.
Scroll down and select “Driving & Navigation”.
Toggle “Tolls” and “Highways” on to match your preference.
(And as a bonus, if you’d like to see an on-screen compass, you can toggle that too—you can read more about the compass function in Maps here.)
Don’t worry about the hassle of turning these toggles off if you actually do want to use a toll road or a highway.
By enabling this function, the navigation instructions will default to the non-toll/non-highway routes, but you’ll still see them as available options when you search for directions.
In the screenshot below you can see how Apple Maps gave us a non-toll route to Chicago but the on-screen warning notes that there is are faster routes that use toll roads and/or highways.
If you look at the suggested routes you can see these alternative routes (the toll route is flagged with a $ symbol).

How Nightstand Mode Works on the Apple Watch

How Nightstand Mode Works on the Apple Watch.
Did you know your Apple Watch can double as a bedside clock while it’s charging?
It’s called Nightstand mode, but there are some caveats you should know about before you get rid of your traditional alarm clock.
What Is Nightstand Mode?
When you put your Apple Watch on its charger and place it upright, it will automatically go into Nightstand Mode, which switches the screen from your usual watch face to a big digital clock that takes up the whole screen.
Start by opening up the app, scrolling down, and tapping on “General”.
First off, when you have your Apple Watch in Nightstand Mode, the screen doesn’t stay on.
To turn the screen back on, you just have to give the watch a light tap anywhere and it will illuminate for another few seconds.
This can be really inconvenient when you wake up in the middle of the night wondering what time it is, only to realize you have to reach over to turn the watch’s screen on while you’re half asleep.
You also can’t adjust the brightness of the screen whenever it does kick on.

Building 1,000 Toy Trucks: Kansas City Woodworkers Guild Shares the Love

Building 1,000 Toy Trucks: Kansas City Woodworkers Guild Shares the Love.
To date, they have 700 members of various woodworking backgrounds, from novice to amateur to professionals.
In support of their mission, for the past several years, the Kansas City Woodworkers Guild has been exhibiting at Maker Faire Kansas City, now in its eighth year, taking place this weekend, June 24 and 25.
This year, they’re prepared to host the building of 1,000 toy trucks.
The bulk of the prep work took place during two “truck build” days, where Guild members came out to help build the truck components.
Leading up to this year’s event, I met with the previous volunteers.
Also, in previous years, it was reported that we ran out of trucks to build.
Not this year!
Furthermore, I would not be able to make this happen if it wasn’t for the Guild members volunteering.
This year, we have shifts that will be filled by more than 30 Guild members, allowing us to build more trucks and be available to speak with adults about the Guild.

How to Delete a Trackr Device From Your Account

How to Delete a Trackr Device From Your Account.
If you need to replace your Trackr, troubleshoot its connection, or just get rid of it entirely, you can easily delete a Trackr from your account.
If you need to replace an old one because its battery has died, you’ll need to delete the old one then add a new Trackr.
Or you can delete it just because you don’t want it anymore.
Regardless, removing the device from your account is pretty straightforward.
To get started, open up the Trackr app and tap the three button menu icon in the top right corner.
Next, tap the settings gear icon next to the device you want to delete.
Tap OK. After this point, your Trackr will no longer be connected to your account.
If you’re getting rid of your Trackr or replacing it with a new one, you can dispose of the old device now.
If you want to re-add it to your account, remove its battery (if it has a removable battery) for about 10 seconds before trying to reconnect it.

How to Force Quit Applications on Your Mac When They’re Not Responding

How to Force Quit Applications on Your Mac When They’re Not Responding.
Sometimes this means the spinning beach ball of death, sometimes this means clicking an open window doesn’t do anything, no matter what you try.
Force Quit an Application Using the Force Quit Menu The simplest way to for an application to quit is the aptly named Force Quit tool, which you can find under the Apple logo in the menu bar.
(You can also open this window by pressing Command+Option+Esc, which is like the Mac version of Ctrl+Alt+Delete.)
The Force Quit menu is a simple window, floating above all of your windows, with a list of currently running applications.
To force any application to close, click it in the list, then click the “Force Quit” button.
Applications that are totally crashed will sometimes have the word “Not Responding” in red next to the name.
Happily, you can force quit such applications just as easily as any other: just select it, then click Force Quit.
Unlike the Force Quit tool, you’ll see every process running on your Mac.
Click “Force Quit” and the application should close instantly.

How to Change the Colors of Directories and Files in the ls Command

If you’ve run the ls command in Bash, you’ll notice that the directories and files you see are colorized according to their type.
How to Set Custom Colors The LS_COLORS variable contains a list of file types along with associated color codes.
Let’s say we want to make files with the .desktop file extension an underlined cyan color, as well.
We can run the following command to do so: LS_COLORS=”di=1:31:*.desktop=4;36″ This tells ls that directories (di) are (=) bold (1;) red (31) and (:) any file ending in .desktop (*.desktop) is (=) underlined (4;) cyan (36).
To assemble your own list, you’ll just need to know the list of color codes and file type codes.
Hidden Text: 8 When specifying an attribute or more than one color code, separate the list of codes with a semicolon (;) character.
For example, since bold text is color code 1 and yellow text is color code 33, you’d use di=1;33 to make directories bold yellow.
Putting together the file type codes and color codes from the lists above, you’d get: LS_COLORS=”di=1;35:ex=4;31:*.mp3=1;32;41″ How to Set Your New Default Colors You now have a custom LS_COLORS variable that functions in the current Bash session.
nano ~/.bashrc Add your custom LS_COLORS variable to a new line at the end of the file, like so: LS_COLORS=”di=1;35:ex=4;31:*.mp3=1;32;41″ Save the file and exit.
If you don’t set the LS_COLORS value, Bash will use the default colors.

How to Change the Colors of Directories and Files in the ls Command

If you’ve run the ls command in Bash, you’ll notice that the directories and files you see are colorized according to their type.
How to Set Custom Colors The LS_COLORS variable contains a list of file types along with associated color codes.
Let’s say we want to make files with the .desktop file extension an underlined cyan color, as well.
We can run the following command to do so: LS_COLORS=”di=1:31:*.desktop=4;36″ This tells ls that directories (di) are (=) bold (1;) red (31) and (:) any file ending in .desktop (*.desktop) is (=) underlined (4;) cyan (36).
To assemble your own list, you’ll just need to know the list of color codes and file type codes.
Hidden Text: 8 When specifying an attribute or more than one color code, separate the list of codes with a semicolon (;) character.
For example, since bold text is color code 1 and yellow text is color code 33, you’d use di=1;33 to make directories bold yellow.
Putting together the file type codes and color codes from the lists above, you’d get: LS_COLORS=”di=1;35:ex=4;31:*.mp3=1;32;41″ How to Set Your New Default Colors You now have a custom LS_COLORS variable that functions in the current Bash session.
nano ~/.bashrc Add your custom LS_COLORS variable to a new line at the end of the file, like so: LS_COLORS=”di=1;35:ex=4;31:*.mp3=1;32;41″ Save the file and exit.
If you don’t set the LS_COLORS value, Bash will use the default colors.

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