Finance

You Don’t Need More Money Advice, You Just Need Advice You Can Relate To

If you’re reading this, you’re probably at least a little interested in getting your finances in order. Maybe you’ve even tried! Maybe you’ve read a bunch of advice, but nothing seems to work for you. If that sounds familiar, the solution might not be to find more advice. Instead, focus on finding advice that speaks to you.

Personal finance is, you know, personal. It’s right there in the name, but people seem to forget just how much money management has to do with your own unique situation, habits, and behaviors. Some money writers focus on their personal debt stories. Others, like me, usually focus on practical tips. And some financial experts focus on the mindset of money in our society. At its core, though, all of this personal finance advice is more or less the same. It’s the approach that’s different. The best money advice, then, is the advice you can actually relate to.

Find a Story That Motivates You

When I first started reading and writing about money, so many people recommended Ramit Sethi’s I Will Teach You to Be Rich, saying it completely changed their life. Sethi offers the same advice that’s worked for ages, but he packages it in a way that speaks to a lot of people. For example, he’s not into cutting back on lattes. Instead of being frugal and saving $3 at a time, he argues, you should focus on saving money where it matters—housing, food, and other large expenses.

Many people find this attitude refreshing. The idea that they can still enjoy small pleasures, like a daily latte, makes them totally want to do this money thing. The advice seems to contradict traditional personal finance advice, which makes it appealing, but when you really dig into it, the advice is standard: cut back on stuff you don’t care about so you have more money to spend on things you do care about. What sets Sethi’s advice apart, though, is his mindset toward money. And that’s everything.

In other words, he has a relatable story: the guy bucking frugality to take control and do what works for him. People…

6 Infuriating Ways You’re Ruining Someone Else’s Credit

Your credit score is one of the biggest deciding factors in your financial health. It influences whether you qualify for the best interest rates on mortgages or auto loans, it can impact your insurance rates, and it can even determine whether you land that dream job or not.

Establishing good credit requires managing your credit accounts responsibly. But your own credit score isn’t the only one that can suffer the consequences of poor credit management. In the same way money can ruin a friendship, your financial carelessness could ruin someone else’s credit. Here’s how.

1. Charging up someone else’s credit card

Becoming an authorized user on someone else’s credit card helps build your own credit history. You’ll receive a credit card in your name, and you’re allowed to make charges on the account. But even though your name is on the card and the account shows up on your credit report, only the primary account holder receives the statements. This person is ultimately responsible for any purchases you make with the card.

If you’re an authorized user, the mature thing to do is pay whatever you charge each month. If you don’t or can’t pay, this sets in motion a chain of events that could ruin the other person’s credit.

Any purchases you charge to the account can raise the primary account holder’s balance and increase their credit utilization ratio beyond a healthy range (utilization ratio is the credit card balance compared to the credit limit). Ideally, credit utilization should never exceed 30 percent of a credit limit — the lower, the better. A high utilization ratio can lower credit scores.

In addition, ringing up charges on someone’s credit card and not paying what you owe could trigger payment problems. This can happen if the primary user doesn’t have enough money for higher minimum payments. If they can’t pay the credit card bill within 30 days, the credit card company could report the late payment to the credit bureaus. While a 30-day delinquency won’t tank a credit…

5 Things to Remember Every Time You Face a Financial Failure

Failure is a universal phenomenon, but it’s one that makes you feel isolated and alone when it happens to you. When it comes to financial failures — from thwarted entrepreneurial ambitions, to poor investment decisions, to overwhelming debt — the feeling of failure is magnified by the fact that talking about money is taboo in our culture, and there are relatively few safe spaces to discuss your financial problems.

But financial failure is just as common as any other kind of failure, and there is no reason to let it derail your path to success. When you face a financial failure, remembering these key facts can help you pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and keep working toward your financial goals.

1. No One Else Is Keeping Track of Your Failures

Just out of my graduate education program, I applied for a teaching position at every school district within driving distance. I sent out about two dozen applications. I went on about four job interviews. And two weeks before the school year began, I landed an interview and a job at my preferred district.

During that time, I beat myself up for all the districts that weren’t calling me and all the interviews that didn’t result in a job. But from the outside, my series of failures looked like me landing a job right out of graduate school at the district of my choice.

Facing a series of failures before reaching success is a part of life, but no one other than you sees all of those failures. If you’ve tried over and over again to get the job you want, or tame your credit card debt, or qualify for a small business loan, no one other than you will be keeping a tally of the times it didn’t work. You are the only person tracking your failures.

2. Failure Is Not the End

Life is a little messier than in the movies. Moments of success do not end with a swell of music and rolling credits — and neither do moments of failure. Your life continues after you declare bankruptcy, even if your day-to-day life looks a little different from it did before your bankruptcy.

That means no financial failure is the end of the story — unless you choose to let it be the end. Yes, you made some mistakes in the…

5 Providers of Debt Consolidation Services and Loans for Businesses

Debt Consolidation Services

Business and entrepreneurship in particular is among the riskiest endeavors you will ever take. Most of the time, you find that you have a unique business idea and a ready market. Things look up and to generate more revenue, you may choose to use your business credit card or take up a few loans just to finance and to build your business.

Unfortunately, there is an economic crisis, and you are unable to repay your loans and your sales drop. What do you do then? File for bankruptcy? Of course, this is the first idea that will cross your mind, but it may not be the best way out for you.

There is a better alternative – debt consolidation.

Debt consolidation refers to the putting together all your existing loans and credit card debts into one. Basically, you will take up a loan to repay your loan, now consolidated into one unit with a lower interest rate. The one big loan taken up pays off all your existing loans and credit debts and you will have one loan to service.

Your business is eligible for debt consolidation if you have several creditors breathing on your accountant’s neck monthly and when you need a better system of repaying all your creditors.

The first step is to determine the amount you owe against the amount you have or what you can afford to repay monthly. Choose a plan[1] that will work well for your business. After that, you should find a company or a reliable debt consolidation service provider. There are various service providers, but the main ones include:

1. Online debt consolidation companies/peer-to-peer lenders

There are many of these nowadays and you may be stuck on which company to choose, especially when inexperienced. As a rule of thumb, research, review, and ask, even though online businesses have debt consolidation loans[2] made easy. Your financial counsellors, colleagues, or acquaintances will guide you in the right direction. Some of the leading online debt consolidation loan companies include:

  1. LendingClub: This is one of the nation’s biggest peer-to-peer lenders. If your business’ credit score is strong, then you will enjoy debt consolidation services at low interest rates from this online entity. Their rates are easy to understand and calculate because all the necessary items are described clearly. The LendingClub has been accredited and you can trust…