Food

Your Best Weird Food Habits, Securing Online Accounts From Shady Apps, and the Appeal of Conspiracy Theories

This week we confessed our favorite freaky food concoctions—think Doritos peanut butter sandwiches and buttered ramen—secured our online accounts by revoking access from shady apps, looked at the ramifications of Trump’s tax plan, and more. Here’s a look back at this week’s most popular posts.

Remember a few weeks ago, when I asked you all for your strangest, slightly-shameful, secret food habits? It turns out that you people are dirt bag geniuses, and were able to open my eyes to new and exciting ways to eat mac and cheese, instant ramen, and spam.

While cocktails aren’t exactly good for you—alcohol is a toxin after all—some drinks can be more dangerous than others. These dicey craft cocktail ingredients can be found in bars all over the place.

Of all the physical indignities of having a baby—the delivery, the breastfeeding, the mesh undies that made me feel like an enormous wounded sea creature snagged in a tiny net—the postpartum stomach pooch is among the worst.

Every once in a while, an app like Unroll.me pops into the spotlight to remind usthat we all tend to authorize a lot of apps to access our email and social media accounts without much thought. Sometimes, as in the case of Unroll.me, those apps get busy selling off our data. Now’s a good time to audit any other third-party apps you’ve given access to your accounts.

If you’re one of the millions of Americans that downs coffee or other caffeinated beverages to get through the work day, here’s some good news. A new scientific review on the safety of caffeine says drinking up to four cups of coffee, or about 400 milligrams of caffeine, is pretty safe.

We told you what to expect from…

26 High-Protein Low-Fat Foods to Help You Lose Extra Pounds

Most of you may have dreamed of building a perfect body with ‘six-pack abs’ or a ‘thigh gap’. Yes, that’s my dream too.

No matter why you’re trying to get in shape, perhaps you want to become physically stronger, or you want to look better and healthier, there may be times in which it feels like exercising is useless.

An effective plan to lose weight always includes a proper diet. Here’s the simple logic: when your energy intake is greater than your energy output, you gain weight; when your energy output is greater than your energy intake, you lose weight. So without a proper diet, exercise will seem to be useless.

Why High-Protein Low-Fat Foods Are Crucial to Weight Loss

Instead of consuming fat, protein is a better option to reduce the energy intake. Protein plays a major role in building and repairing muscle. It also facilitates the fat-burning metabolism in your body and reduces your appetite so that you eat less. Science reveals another surprising fact about protein: protein itself can make you lose weight even without conscious calories restriction.1 Wow! That’s good news. This means maybe you can lose weight by adjusting you eating habit!

Here we have an extensive list of high-protein low-fat foods for you to work on your weight-loss plan. There are some foods that you may be overlooking!

Fruit and Vegetables

Protein Power: 5 g per 1 cup serving

Spinach does not only contain protein but also vitamins A and C, antioxidants and heart-health folate (folic acid). It is also a good source of manganese, magnesium, and iron.

Steam your spinach instead of eating it raw. This helps retain vitamins and makes it easier for your body to absorb the calcium content. You may also add spinach to soups, or simply steam it and top with pepper, garlic, olive oil and a squeeze of lemon.

2. Sun-dried Tomatoes

Protein Power: 6 g per 1 cup serving

Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, which can reduce your risk of bladder, lung, prostate, skin, and stomach cancer, as well as decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. Compared with fresh ones, sun-dried tomatoes contain 20% more lycopene per serving.

They are available dry or packed in oil. Sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil are softer and easier to blend into receipes. You may use them in salads, sandwiches, sauces, or use them as a pizza topping.

3. Guava

Protein Power: 4.2 g per 1 cup serving

This tropical fruit is an excellent source of vitamin C. It is also extraordinarily rich in lycopene and antioxidants that are beneficial for your skin. Without compromising your intake of proteins, vitamins and fiber, guava helps you lose weight by regulating your metabolism.

Eat it raw. Guava, especially raw guava, has far less sugar compared to other fruits like apples, oranges, and grapes.

4. Artichokes

Protein Power: 4.2 g per 1 medium vegetable

Artichokes are rich in fiber and protein, which are the two important elements for making your stomach full so that the hormone which increases your appetite is suppressed. If you want to lose weight, artichokes should be definitely on your list.

Boil and eat the whole artichoke as a self-contained salad. You may also add some goat cheese and sun-dried tomatoes to make it taste better.

5. Peas

Protein Power: 8 g per 1 cup serving

A cup of green peas contains 8 times the protein of a cup of spinach. Peas are a very good source of vitamins, manganese, and fiber. The high-level of fiber helps you to stay away from cravings for junk food.

You may add some green peas to an omelet to boost eggs’ satiating power. If you are looking for the frozen green peas, make sure there’s no giant pea ice cube in the bag. A giant pea ice cube means the peas have been thawed previously and then refrozen, which may degrade their quality.

Red Meat

6. Grass-fed Beef

Protein Power: 26 g per 4 oz serving

Everyone knows that red meat like beef contains a rich amount of protein. But grass-fed beef does more good to you than conventional grain-fed beef. Grass-fed beef is naturally leaner and has fewer calories and fat. The omega-3 fatty acids in it also reduces the risk of heart disease.

Grass-fed beef is more expensive than the grain-fed one. But its nutritional benefits are way greater.

7. Ostrich

Protein Power: 29 g per 4 oz serving

Another kind of red meat you may want to try is ostrich meat. It has less fat than turkey or chicken but has the rich taste of beef. The choline in ostrich meat is also one of the essential nutrients for fat loss.

Ostrich meat is easy to prepare and rich in taste. Ideally, a steak or fillet should be served medium rare. It will become dry if it is fully cooked.

8. Pork

Protein Power: 24 g per 4 oz serving

Pork is another typical red meat that is rich in protein. Among all the parts of pork, you should choose to have pork tenderloin, which is believed to be the healthiest choice. It has slightly less fat than a skinless chicken breast. Science also proves that fresh lean pork helps with the reduction of your waist size, BMI, and belly fat! 2

Soak your pork in brine to have more tender meat by helping to break down muscle tissue. Cover and chill for 30 minutes to 2 hours…

Edible Innovations: FarmBot Helps Automate Small-Scale Food Production

From Singapore to the USA and all around Europe, Edible Innovations profiles food makers that engage in improving the global food system at every stage, from production to distribution to eating and shopping. Join us as we explore the main trends in the industry from a maker perspective. Chiara Cecchini of Food Innovation Program — an ecosystem with a strong educational core that promotes food innovation as a key tool to tackle the great challenges of the future — introduces you to the faces, stories, and experiences of food makers around the globe. Check back on Tuesdays and Thursdays for new installments.

As you get ready to prepare your favorite dinner dish, you may find yourself picking up fruit out of season, packaged meat that comes from a different country, and carbohydrates that have been processed in different states. A glance at the average shopping cart raises a few questions. Where does our food come from? How was it produced? In many big chain grocery stores, this answer has become elusive due to the rise of mega farms that create and produce our food by any means necessary.

Rick Carlino and Rory Aronson saw an inherent flaw in this ask-no-questions approach to food, especially in the wake of the growing statistics that proved environmental degradation and lack quality food accessibility. For most shoppers, the location of where their products come from is a mystery. For those unable (or unwilling) to buy food from large chain grocery stores, access to food is often scarce and unreliable.

Carlino and Aronson addressed this growing problem by founding a company called FarmBot.io (@farmbotio), which strives to create open-source, easy to use technology…

Irritated by Dandruff? No Worries We Are Here To Help You!

Dandruff is a perfectly common condition, but it doesn’t make experiencing those little white flakes on your shoulders any less embarrassing. Even though we may know many people share our frustration with the dry flakes of skin falling onto our dark clothing in a business meeting or first date, it feels so personal in the moment, and it can be hard to ignore the way you feel.

Dandruff can be a tricky thing to deal with, as it has numerous causes. Along with the most common causes, dry skin and psoriasis, it is supposedly caused by not cleaning your scalp often enough, or cleaning it too often. To make this even more frustrating, some people say it can also be caused by simply shampooing with something your sensitive scalp doesn’t like. So how are you supposed to deal with it. And what exactly is dandruff, really?

What’s going on up there?

Part of the embarrassment of dandruff is the misunderstanding behind it; a lot of people believe that dandruff is caused by poor hygiene. But this isn’t scientifically sound. In fact, experts agree this is probably the last thing responsible for those flakes. Dandruff is a skin condition, first and foremost. It causes your scalp, and the scalps of 50% of the population, to flake off in tiny little pieces and usually comes with some itching. It’s closely linked to something called Malassezia. This is a fungus that everyone has (sorry) on their scalps and it feeds on the oils secreted by hair follicles. This can cause skin cells to shed and clump into those annoying flakes 1.

Surprisingly, dandruff doesn’t just happen on your scalp. In fact, you can get dandruff on your face. Plenty of people discover dandruff in their eyebrows, around their ears and even on their noses. Basically, if your skin produces oil, it’s at risk of producing dandruff 2.

Regardless of where you experience it, before you run to the store to purchase dandruff shampoo, make sure you are truly experiencing dandruff, and not something else. Beverly Hills dermatologist Stuart H Kaplan, M.D. recommends a medicated dandruff shampoo that contains ketoconazole, selenium sulfide or zinc. If you don’t see any improvement after two weeks of using the ‘poo, you may want to consult a physician. You could have psoriasis or another skin inflammation.

The Causes of Dandruff.

Some studies have found diet can impact your risk for dandruff, claiming people who eat lots of salt, too much sugar or foods rich in spice can experience more dandruff than a person with a healthier diet. Excessive alcohol use can also lead to flaking skin. However, with a significant number of dandruff sufferers claiming it seems to get better as they age, the jury was out as to whether it really is caused by what you’re eating or if it’s just something we all have to experience. That is until 2007.

In 2007, scientists found that the fungal yeast responsible for dandruff produces enzymes which break down oils produced by our sweat glands. This creates an acid which penetrates the top layer of our skin and triggers cells to be created faster…

Air New Zealand’s London Pop-Up Restaurant Only Sells Airplane Food

Bad airplane food is a cliché for a reason, but Air New Zealand is bucking the trend, Food & Wine reports. The airline’s new in-flight menus feature culinary creations by New Zealand chef Michael Meredith and Peter Gordon, the Kiwi-born executive chef of London’s popular The Providores and Tapa Room. To promote their revamped meal options, Air New Zealand launched a free, two-day pop-up restaurant in London that serves nothing but airplane food.

The temporary outpost, called This is How We Fly, is running out of the Unit London gallery in Soho, but it’s only sticking around for two days—April 25 and April 26 (which is today, which means you’ve only got a few hours left to give it a try). Patrons sit in airplane chairs and dine on options including “lamb with minted peas, braised lettuce with bacon lardons, and salt roasted crushed new potatoes with mint jelly”…

Nomiku simplifies sous vide cooking with new device that prepares food using RFID scanner

Two years ago, Nomiku began its journey to bring its Wi-Fi-enabled sous vide device to market, first raising $750,000 through a Kickstarter campaign and then adding $250,000 more during an appearance on the reality show Shark Tank. More than $3 million worth of products has been sold, and on Wednesday, the company is expanding its cooking technology to include not just a meal program, but also a sous chef device that will properly prepare meals automatically — all you have to do is scan the package.

Nomiku’s main product is a connected sous vide immersion circulator that will heat up whatever you’re cooking to the right temperature every time, whether it’s a steak, fish, or whatever. But that still requires some manual labor, such as prep time and figuring out what you want to eat. Today’s updates further simplify the process.

Above: Nomiku meal: Chicken thigh in Thai yellow curry.

With meals priced between $8 and $14 for entrees and $4 and $6 for sides, Nomiku is taking a step to make it more convenient for people to eat instead of spending excess time in the preparation process. Some of the dishes you can order include braised red cabbage, charred sweet potatoes with lime and cumin, jasmine rice with fried shallot, and pork shoulder with chipotle adobo. If you order $80 worth of…

Do You Know Eating The Right Kind Of Food Can Actually Help You Sleep?

Have you ever laid in bed, exhausted from the day’s activities, and yet still can’t fall asleep?

Do you wake up in the middle of the night and find it hard, impossible even, to get back to sleep?

Have you tried cutting out caffeine and other stimulants from your diet, and still can’t sleep?

Have you resorted to prescription or over-the-counter sleep aids to get you through the night?

If you have trouble sleeping, you aren’t alone. It’s estimated that over 20 million Americans experience some form of sleep problems, and over 40 million suffer from a chronic sleep condition. From trouble falling asleep to the inability to enjoy a full night’s rest, there exist more than 70 different sleep disorders that force many people to seek intervention. But most people don’t consider that, aside from sleep aids, there are many foods to help you sleep.

Why Try Foods Over Other Treatments to Help You Sleep?

Losing a night or two of sleep doesn’t seem like a big deal for most people, but too many sleepless nights can quickly take a toll on many aspects of your body. Lack of sleep can affect your mood, focus, physical appearance, and memory, and can ultimately lead to an increased risk in heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke.

These are serious consequences, but are ones that can be avoided when you introduce enough of the right foods into your diet.

People who continuously experience sleep troubles often turn to mainstream medicine to get quick relief. Doctors can prescribe medications that can make you sleep, or you can grab an over-the-counter sleep remedy. These seem like viable options to people who are desperate for any amount of sleep, but medications also come with their own sets of risks, like dependency, that might make you worse off than if you had forgone them altogether.

Prescription drugs and supplements often carry some type of dependency risk factor, tricking your body into lowering its own natural production of chemicals that help induce sleep. Sometimes, sleeping pills can help you get such an incredible night’s sleep that you’ll never want to go to bed without them again. But long-term use isn’t usually recommended.

Granted, most people know that foods and drinks like soda, coffee, and chocolate can greatly boost your inability to fall asleep, even when your body feels tired. But just as there exists stimulating edibles to keep you alert and moving, there are also several foods to help you sleep.

And unlike potentially addicting sleeping pills, these foods are 100% safe, non-addicting, and prescription-free.

Before you make a mad dash to the pharmacy to help you catch your zzz’s, try incorporating some of these foods to help you sleep more soundly:

Walnuts are a solid source of the amino acid Tryptophan, which helps produce serotonin and melatonin to help you sleep. Each 1-ounce serving of walnuts contains about 170 mg of…

Just viewing super-size meals can promote overeating

food huge
food huge

A girl sits down to a plate loaded with pizza. A boy gets a few baby carrots. Immediately, both kids’ brains start taking stock what’s in front of them. Consciously, the kids might be thinking “Yum” or “Yuck.” But their brains are also processing how much food is there — a feast, or just a nibble. And they’re cataloguing whether it contains a lot of calories per bite or just a little. Different parts of the brain are responsible for handling these two questions, a new study finds. The answers they come up with could limit the diner’s self-control.

Studies show that the more food there is on a plate, the more someone is likely to eat. Nutritionists call that the “portion size effect.” It doesn’t matter what kind of food it is. It also doesn’t matter whether the diner is young or old, male or female, alone or in a group. The bigger the portion, the bigger the appetite.

Laural English is a nutritionist at Pennsylvania State University in University Park. She knows that many eating habits that kids pick up in early childhood will still be there when they are adults. So she and her colleagues wanted to find out what happens in the brain when a child sees a large portion of food. Knowing what drives kids’ eating habits might help families create healthier lifelong habits.

Calories are a measurement of the amount of energy contained in food. English and her team also wondered if it matters whether a large serving is packed with calories (such as pizza), or less energy dense (such as carrots).

“When you’re sitting down to eat a meal, you don’t appreciate all the different impacts or cues in front of you,” notes Kathleen Keller, who helped run the study. “Size, smell, taste, the way food is presented — all have an impact on what the brain perceives and also what you eat,” she says. The new study is the first to look separately at how the brain reacts to portion size and the calories in it, she says.

What happens when the brain perceives a meal?

The research team recruited 36 children to take part. All were aged 7 to 10. Half were boys, half were girls. Nearly all had a healthy weight. To make sure that all of them were hungry, the researchers asked the kids not to eat for two hours before the study began. When kids arrived, the researchers had them climb into a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine. It looks like a giant donut standing on its side, with a bed sticking out of the center. It uses magnets and radio waves to map the flow of blood in someone’s body.

MRI images
While in a brain scanner, children viewed images large and small portions of both high-calorie and low-calorie foods.

Each child had to lay down on the bed with his or her head inside the donut. Staying very still was important. Moving one’s head more than the thickness of a dime would ruin the scan, notes Keller. To help avoid that,…

Food smells better to sleepyheads

hamburger/bun

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. — Foods may smell more appetizing when you’re tired.

Getting too little sleep seems to increase the brain’s sensitivity to food smells, a new study finds. This suggests sleep-deprived people might finds snacks more enticing. If true, this could help explain why people who burn the candle at both ends tend to eat more — and often weigh more.

Surabhi Bhutani is a nutrition scientist at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She shared her team’s new findings here on March 27 at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society’s annual meeting.

The group brought adults into their lab who had had slept only four hours the night before. Each inhaled a sequence of food odors. They might, for instance, include the scent of potato chips or cinnamon rolls….

Rules restricting artificial trans fats are good for heart health

side of fries and oils
Starting in 2007, areas of New York restricted the use of partially hydrogenated oils in eateries, eliminating artificial trans fats from foods like these french fries. As a result, residents experienced fewer heart attacks and strokes, a new study suggests.

OIL OPT OUT

Taking artificial trans fats off the menu reduces hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke, suggests a study that examined what happened after several areas in New York restricted the fats’ use. The findings portend larger scale public health benefits after a nationwide ban on artificial trans fats begins in the United States in 2018.

Hospital admission rates for heart attacks declined 7.8 percent more in New York counties that restricted trans fats than in those counties that had not, researchers report online April 12 in JAMA Cardiology.

“This is the first study that links a trans fats ban to a reduction in heart disease and stroke in large populations,” says nutritional epidemiologist Frank Hu of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “The evidence from this study indicates that implementation of a nationwide ban on trans fats will reduce heart disease and save many lives in the United States.”

Heart disease causes one in every four deaths in the United States. Coronary heart disease, the most common kind, kills more than 370,000 people each year. Past research finds that eating foods containing artificial trans fats, also called trans-fatty acids, increases the risk of coronary heart disease. Among other effects, consuming these fats leads to higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or “bad” cholesterol, a component of artery-clogging plaque. Artificial,…