Photography

This Photographer Brilliantly Documented Crime on the Mean Streets of New York City

Back in 2001, I stumbled upon a photography show at the Getty Center in Los Angeles that I still think is one of my favorite museum exhibits I’ve ever seen. It showcased the work of a photographer who went by the name of Weegee.

Weegee captured street scenes in New York City like no other photographer during the 1930s and 1940s. While he sometimes focused his lens on regular folks going about their daily business, it was his stark black and white photos of crime scenes that made Weegee a legend and exposed people to the dark side of American society.

Weegee was born Usher Fellig in 1899 in what is now part of Ukraine. When he was 10-years-old, his family emigrated to New York. Weegee started taking photographs at a young age, working his way up through several companies before striking out of his own as a freelancer in 1935.

Weegee installed a police scanner in his car so he could be the first photographer on the scene to document New York City’s murders, accidents,…

How I Create Epic “Outdoor” Scenes Almost Without Spending Any Money

I am commercial still life photographer but I love creative or conceptual photoshoots. I love to do miniature photography and what I love about my art is that I can turn my fantasies into reality. Being a miniature photographer, I always think of something new and something everyone can do.

I do not use any expensive ready to use props and dioramas. I make all the stuff I use in a set of the very minimum resources. I usually use plaster of parts to create mountains or rocks and some old paper to give basic shape of hills. I mainly used polystyrene sheets and mixture of plaster and black paint…

What Is a “Stop” in Photography?

“Stop” is a photography term that gets thrown around a lot. Someone will describe a photo as a stop under-exposed, or tell you to increase your shutter speed by a stop. The concept can be a little confusing for new photographers, so let’s look at exactly what a stop is and what it means when it comes to photography.

Stops, Shutter Speed and Aperture

When you take a photograph, the exposure is determined by the area of the aperture and the exposure time (also called shutter speed). Although exposure is basically quantity-less, there are a range of combinations of aperture and exposure time that will create a good photographic exposure. If the aperture is too wide or the exposure time too long, then all you’ll get is a white photo; conversely, if either of them is too low, you’ll just get a black photo.

Since exposure is valueless—you don’t look at a scene and describe it as a 12 stop photo for example—there is no way to talk about things in absolutes. Instead, stops are used to describe relative changes in aperture and exposure time. One stop is equal to a halving (or a doubling) of the amount of light let into the camera by that factor.

So for example, if you have the shutter speed on your camera set to 1/100th of a second, increasing your exposure by one stop would change the shutter speed to 1/50th of a second (letting twice as much light into the camera). Changing your shutter speed to 1/200th of a second (halving the amount of light let into the camera) reduces your exposure by a stop. As you can probably see, for shutter speed the rule is really simple: to increase your exposure by a stop, double your shutter speed; to decrease your exposure by a stop, half it.

Photographers also talk about half-stops or third-stops. Third-stops are especially important as they’re the increment that most cameras use for their settings. These are…

How I Got Seduced By Wildlife Photography

While photography has become my primary language, animal whispering has evolved as a tool to communicate the unique sincerity emerging from a wild animal’s eye. Beyond the Art, wildlife photography allows me to seek the uniqueness in things while engaging with nature in a unique way. When meeting wild animals, I always feel gifted to be able to capture such sincere moments as it makes me feel instantly at peace.

Besides this bond with nature, I enjoy the challenge that is wildlife photography. As there are numerous things you have to deal with when you’re shooting a moving animal, finally getting the perfect shot makes for an unspeakable feeling of satisfaction.

A question I often get is how do you get the birds to land on your hand without food? Although I always wanted to reply saying that I am the real Snow White, every photo session simply starts with bird seeds and a whole lot of patience. However, my goal here isn’t to photograph birds eating out of my hand. The challenge is to create something unique. With persistence, I slowly gain the animal’s trust and it eventually comes to me without food. That’s when the real deal starts. There’s…