United States

The True Story of Brainwashing and How It Shaped America

The word “brainwashing” came about because of the Cold War. In the 1950s, Americans were shocked when thousands of soldiers captured by North Korea eventually confessed to war crimes they hadn’t committed, and some even refused to return to the US when the war was over. That was unthinkable.

Suddenly the threat of brainwashing was very real, and it was everywhere. The U.S. military denied the charges made in the soldiers’ “confessions,” but couldn’t explain how they’d been coerced to make them. What could explain the behavior of the soldiers besides brainwashing? The idea of mind control flourished in pop culture, with movies like Invasion of the Body Snatchers and The Manchurian Candidate showing people whose minds were wiped and controlled…

The Cheapest Ways to Stream NHL Hockey (Even If You Don’t Have Cable)

If you’re like me, you watch hockey, and…basically no other sports. You also, like me, would like to skip the cable subscription. So what’s the cheapest way to watch NHL hockey online so you can cut the cord?

It depends. If you live outside the US or Canada, you can pretty much buy an NHL.tv account and watch everything for around $100 a year. Inside the US and Canada, however, broadcast rights make things complicated, meaning you’ll need to somehow get access to some combination of local, national, and out-of-market games.

Can you watch hockey without cable? Yes, but with all sorts of caveats. It depends which team you want to follow, where you live, and how many blackouts you’re willing to put up with. Here’s a quick cost breakdown for US residents:

  • If you follow your local team (that is, the team based in the city where you live), you can watch every game of the regular season and playoffs for $25 a month using cable replacement Sling TV, though you may need to spend $5 extra the first month of the playoffs for CNBC. Awesome!

  • If you follow an out-of-market team (that is, a team from a city other than where you live), you can watch most games of the regular season with a $130 annual NHL.tv account, and watch any nationally broadcast games with a $25 a month Sling TV account (again, you may need to spend $5 extra in the first month of the playoffs for CNBC access.) Also, because of the freaking NHL Network, out-of-market fans may need to spend $10 a month extra on Sling TV to watch every game of the regular season. You’ll have to decide whether that’s worthwhile to you, because it’s somewhat rare depending on which team you follow.

Confused yet? Read on as we break it all down for you, or skip to the very last section for the cheapest (and most complicated) option.

Watch Regionally Broadcast NHL Games in the USA with Sling TV

During the regular season, the vast majority of NHL games involving US teams are broadcast on Regional Sports Networks (RSNs). If you’re a fan of a team that’s local to where you live, you need access to your local sports channel. You can’t stream them on NHL.tv, because they are “blacked out”—those regional sports networks are given full rights to broadcast the game in an attempt to get you to pay for cable.

The two biggest RSNs are Fox Sports and Comcast/NBC Sports. If the word “Fox Sports” is in the name, or the NBC logo is used, your local sports channel is one of these. Mile High Hockey offers a great map of which channels cover which teams, if you’re not sure; it was made in 2013 but it’s still more-or-less accurate, give or take the Vegas Golden Knights.

So, which streaming services offer these regional networks? Here’s what we found:

  • Sling TV charges $25 a month for their Sling Blue package, which offers the Fox and NBC RSNs.
  • YouTube TV costs $35 a month, and offers the Fox Sports and NBC RSNs.
  • Playstation Vue charges $35 a month for their Core Slim plan which offers the Fox Sports and NBC RSNs (though some users have had problems.)
  • Hulu TV costs $40 a month, and offers the Fox Sports and NBC RSNs.
  • DirecTV Now charges $50 a month for their Just Right package, which includes Fox Sports and NBC RSNs.

As you can see, Sling’s Blue package is the cheapest way to get access to these regional sports broadcasts: $25 and you’ve got either the Comcast/NBC or Fox regional network.

If your local sports channel isn’t from Fox or Comcast/NBC, you’re basically out of luck from what we can tell. In Colorado, for example, the rights to the Avalanche belong to Altitude, a independent channel, and none of these services provide access to that channel. Coverage varies from service to service, so check out all of the services and see if your local sports network is offered. If not, sorry: you’re going to need cable to watch local games (or a VPN—which we’ll talk about in a bit).

Watch Out-of-Market NHL Games in the USA with NHL.tv

I don’t live in my old hometown anymore, but I still cheer for that NHL team. If you want to watch a team located elsewhere in the country, or in Canada for that matter, no regional sports network can give you access to most of the games you want to watch. For fans like us, there’s NHL.tv, the streaming service offered by the league itself. For $130 a year, you can watch every out-of-market game—this works out to around $16 a month for the eight months of the regular season.

An “out-of-market” game is any game that you couldn’t watch on cable even if you wanted to, because it’s not on nationally and no regional network local to you is airing it. Again, Mile High Sports has a pretty good map of the blackout areas if you’re interested.

NHL.tv is a particularly good deal if you are a fan of a Canadian team, or a small market American team that NBC generally ignores. Games involving these teams are rarely broadcast nationally in the United States, so fans can more or less watch every game of the regular season, free from blackouts. The only exceptions are when your team plays the team local to where you live, or NHL Network decides to ruin your day (more on them later.)

On the flip side, NHL.tv is a pretty bad deal if you’re a fan of a big-market American team. Over 25 Chicago Blackhawks games are broadcast nationally every year, meaning you won’t be able to watch those games on NHL.tv; you need access to national broadcasts in order to watch them. Check your team’s schedule and see how many games are broadcast nationally before buying this service: if you aren’t the kind of fan who…

Far Cry 5 will be set in Montana

Far Cry 5 will be set in a place called Hope County, Montana, as the open world shooter franchise comes to America for the first time, according to Ubisoft.

Ubisoft has set a reveal event for May 26. There isn’t much to see so far, but Far Cry fans have been waiting for the next installment of Far Cry ever since Far Cry 4 debuted in November 2014.

Ubisoft posted a video with a country music twang and imagery of a beautiful mountain stream. Beyond that, it didn’t say anything. But it has release a couple of more videos that show a many running through a field of crops and getting shot, as well as another person being assaulted atop a bell tower in a country church.

Each Far Cry game…

Regardless of Trump, US businesses are speeding toward a low-carbon world

While Trump’s administration grapples with its position on climate change, it’s worth stepping back to see the wider picture in the US, believes Lance Pierce, North America president of the CDP. In fact – he writes from New York – it is business that is really taking action on climate

It is vital for the US to lead on the Paris Agreement on climate change. This is, of course, the global commitment made in 2015 enabling the world to tackle rising CO2 emissions and prevent a catastrophic further two degrees warming of the planet. Global warming doesn’t just increase temperatures, it threatens food security, clean water, and people’s health. Some 145 countries, including the UK and the US, have sealed the deal. It is this agreement that is currently being scrutinised by the US government. Will President Trump pull out?

We need to accelerate our joint actions as people, organisations and nations to have maximum impact, and the Paris Agreement represents a meaningful shift towards a low carbon economy. That is, it provides a clear path to guide our emissions reductions together with the rest of the world.

Everyone is quickly learning that cutting carbon pays

Our country’s power is not all in the capital in Washington. In fact, it is spread right across our vast nation, spanning boardrooms, city and state borders. Governments are not working alone: companies, investors, citizens, cities, states and regions are thankfully awake to the urgent need for tackling climate change and are the major force behind the move to a low carbon world. This will continue regardless of the US federal government’s position, a crucial point to remember.

Climate change is an urgent concern and our investors at the CDP, formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project, want to know how companies are dealing with environmental risk and working to build a green and fair economy. We see investors buying into those…

Indigenous reconciliation: making peace with the past

Injustices of the past continue to affect people in indigenous communities today. Franki Cookney investigates how Standing Rock has brought efforts towards reconciliation with indigenous groups to the world’s attention

Beds and food were running scarce, a blizzard was approaching and the wind chill factor was minus 40 as thousands of US veterans travelled to the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in South Dakota in December last year. They were answering a call to protect their fellow Americans, and ended up taking part in a reconciliation ceremony in which they apologised for a long history of US violence against indigenous people.

Their plan was to give respite to the Native Americans protesting against plans for the Dakota Access pipeline, and to shield indigenous activists from attacks by a militarised police force. Conditions at the camp were becoming more and more difficult when the news came that the pipeline – which protesters say would contaminate their water supply and threaten sacred land – had been halted. With president-elect Trump a month away from being inaugurated, protesters suspected the triumph could be short-lived. Nevertheless, thousands of people were arriving to stand in solidarity. It seemed both a positive moment for the campaign and something of a landmark for indigenous relations across the US.

On 5 December, 2016, the veterans and their Sioux hosts came together in a ceremony of reconciliation. Led by Wes Clark Junior, former army lieutenant and son of general Wesley Clark, who was himself a former supreme allied commander of NATO, the veterans dropped to their knees, heads bowed, and asked the tribal elders for forgiveness. Clark candidly listed the wrongs inflicted on the Native Americans.

Veterans listen to Ivan Looking Horse during a healing ceremony at Standing Rock. Credit: Stephanie Keith/Reuters

“We didn’t respect you, we polluted your earth, we’ve hurt you in so many ways but we’ve come to say that we are sorry. We are at your service and we beg for your forgiveness,” he said. The ceremony was an ad hoc affair, recalls veteran Kevin Basl, but none the less poignant for it.

“The Sioux passed around eagle feathers and said we were now tied to the land and obligated to protect it,” he says.

Basl was a radar commander in the US army between 2003 and 2008, during which time he served two tours in Iraq. He is now a writer and member of the Iraq Veterans Against the War group. He went to Standing Rock because, after leaving the army, he felt very disillusioned about his time there. Having joined up to ‘do good’, he didn’t feel he had been able to. Of his time at Standing Rock he says: “There, instead of helping military contractors make money, I felt like I was finally serving the people.”

He says the ceremony was fairly spontaneous. “I heard about it through word of mouth on the camp. I didn’t know whether to believe it but we followed our instincts and went along anyway. I was exhausted, but the emotional weight and significance of the event kept me riveted. The Native Americans receiving the apology made rounds to hug every veteran.”

Maria Michael, a Lakota leader, embraces US army veteran Tatiana McLee. Credit: Helen H. Richardson/Getty Images

But was the ceremony a token gesture, or a real step forward for peace, forgiveness and reconciliation?

Writer and artist Pat McCabe is a Navajo, or Diné, activist from New Mexico, US. She believes the events at Standing Rock represent a moment of genuine progress. “The veterans’ apology brought up so much emotion. It was a clear example of stepping outside the usual way of seeing things,” she says.

“Alongside that, the way that [US TV host] Lawrence O’Donnell started to comment on Standing Rock in news reports was very moving. He discussed US history in a way that a Native person could…

Cybersecurity firm Crowdstrike raises $100 million at more than $1 billion valuation

CrowdStrike, the cybersecurity firm that burst onto the national scene during the U.S. election season last year when it became the first to pin a data breach at the Democratic National Committee on Russia, said on Wednesday that it has closed a $100 million funding round at a valuation exceeding $1 billion.

The new round has propelled the firm into the rarified ranks of the “unicorn” club, the group of startups valued at a billion dollars or more. The company has raised $256 million to date.

The latest fundraising was led by Accel, a venture capital firm based in Palo Alto, Calif. that also participated in two of CrowdStrike’s earlier funding rounds. Joining the latest round were new investors March Capital Partners, a year-old VC firm based in Santa Monica, Calif., and Telstra, Australia’s biggest telecom company and an early CrowdStrike customer, as well as existing investors CapitalG (formerly Google Capital) and Warburg Pincus.

Founded six years ago, CrowdStrike has made a name for itself investigating some of the world’s biggest data breaches and calling out nation-state sponsored hacker groups in the process. The startup helped build a case that North Korea digitally pummeled Sony Pictures in 2014, that China orchestrated a ransacking of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management in 2015, and that Russian intelligence agencies masterminded the DNC breach last year.

George Kurtz, CrowdStrike’s cofounder and CEO, told Fortune that he’s pushing a “cloud-first” model for security, meaning that customers subscribe to install lightweight software agents on computers that…

Miss District of Columbia crowned as Miss USA

Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts after she was crowned the new Miss USA during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts after she was crowned the new Miss USA during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The District of Columbia has won back-to-back Miss USA titles.

Kara McCullough, a 25-year-old scientist working for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, was crowned Sunday at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center on the Las Vegas Strip. She will go on to compete on the Miss Universe contest.

Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough, center, reacts with fellow contestants after she was crowned the new Miss USA during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough, center, reacts with fellow contestants after she was crowned the new Miss USA during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

“I’m extremely thankful for this opportunity,” she said after the event. “I just want to encourage so many women nationwide to find their passion in any subject possible and understand that nothing is difficult if you really, truly put the work in for it.”

Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough, center, reacts with fellow contestants after she was crowned the new Miss USA during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough, center, reacts with fellow contestants after she was crowned the new Miss USA during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Fifty-one women representing each state and the nation’s capital participated in the decades-old competition. The runner-up of the night was Miss New Jersey Chhavi Verg, a marketing and Spanish student at Rutgers University, while the second runner-up was Miss Minnesota Meridith Gould, who is studying apparel retail merchandising at the University of Minnesota.

Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts after she was crowned the new Miss USA during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts after she was crowned the new Miss USA during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

McCullough was born in Naples, Italy, and raised in Virginia Beach, Virginia. She said she wants to inspire children to pursue careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Miss District of Columbia USA and new Miss USA Kara McCullough, right, embraces first runner up Miss New Jersey USA Chhavi Verg during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Miss District of Columbia USA and new Miss USA Kara McCullough, right, embraces first runner up Miss New Jersey USA Chhavi Verg during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Last year, District of Columbia resident Deshauna Barber became the first-ever military member to win Miss USA.

Miss Minnesota USA Meridith Gould reacts after she won second runner up during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Miss Minnesota USA Meridith Gould reacts after she won second runner up during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

The top five finalists where asked different questions that touched on the pros and cons of social media, women’s rights and issues affecting teenagers. McCullough was asked whether she thinks that affordable health care for all U.S. citizens is a right or a privilege. McCullough said it is a privilege.

Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts as she is crowned the new Miss USA by former Miss USA Deshauna Barber during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts as she is crowned the new Miss USA by former Miss USA Deshauna Barber during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

“As a government employee, I’m granted health care and I see firsthand that for one to have health care, you need to have jobs.”

Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts as she is crowned the new Miss USA by former Miss USA Deshauna Barber during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts as she is crowned the new Miss USA by former Miss USA Deshauna Barber during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

McCullough’s office at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission focuses on emergency preparedness. She said she will be discussing with her work supervisor whether she will take a leave of absence.

Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts as she is crowned the new Miss USA by former Miss USA Deshauna Barber during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough reacts as she is crowned the new Miss USA by former Miss USA Deshauna Barber during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Later in the competition, McCullough, Verg and Gould were asked to explain what they consider feminism…

5 immigrant women vie for Miss USA pageant title

In this May 11, 2017, photo, Miss New Jersey USA Chhavi Verg, right, competes during a preliminary competition for Miss USA in Las Vegas. Very emigrated from India with her parents. Five of the contestants vying for the Miss USA title this year were born in other countries and now U.S. citizens. (John Locher/Associated Press)

LAS VEGAS — Five of the contestants vying for the Miss USA title have a message to immigrant girls and women watching the pageant this weekend: Set goals, work hard and don’t stay in the shadows.

The contestants know what they are talking about as they were all born in other countries and immigrated to the U.S. at young ages as their families pursued their versions of the American Dream. The women are now all U.S. citizens.

“I want them to see that anything is possible if you work hard,” said Linnette De Los Santos, who immigrated with her family from the Dominican Republic when she was 5 years old. “As Miss USA, I would love to be able to be that inspiration for our immigrant community. If I would have stopped following my dreams and working hard towards what I wanted, I wouldn’t be sitting here as Miss Florida USA or in law school ready to become an immigration attorney.”

The competition airs Sunday from Las Vegas.

De Los Santos, Miss North Dakota Raquel Wellentin, Miss Hawaii Julie Kuo, Miss Connecticut Olga Litvinenko and Miss New Jersey Chhavi Verg spoke to The Associated Press about the opportunities and challenges they’ve faced as immigrants.

Their remarks stand in stark contrast to the scandal that enveloped the pageant in 2015, when part owner and now President Donald Trump offended…

The Woman Who Stood Between America and an Epidemic of Birth Defects

You may or may not be old enough to remember the horror of Thalidomide, a drug that caused thousands of birth defects in Britain, Canada, and West Germany in the late 1959s and early ’60s. It didn’t do much harm in the U.S. because the drug was never approved by the FDA. Therein lies a story, much of it the work of Frances Oldham Kelsey. The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act was passed in 1938, in no small part due to Kelsey’s work.

Kelsey was first introduced to the dangers of mass marketed unsafe pharmaceuticals in 1937, when the FDA enlisted Geiling to solve…

Stephen Colbert Gleefully Responds to Donald Trump’s Insults: “I Won”

Stephen Colbert, The Late Show, Donald Trump
CBS, Molly Riley/ Pool via Bloomberg

The gloves are off in the Stephen Colbert vs. Donald Trump showdown.

The President of the United States had said in a recent interview that the Late Show host, who regularly slams him on TV and recently made a particularly crude comment about him, is a “a no-talent guy.” Colbert responded to Trump on his program Thursday night.

“The president also spoke to Time magazine about the most important issue to him—this show,” Colbert said, before proceeding to imitate the U.S. leader saying the words the magazine quoted him as saying.

“The President of the United States has personally come after me and my show and there’s only one thing to say. Hee-hee-hee-hee-hee!” the host continued, cackling and clapping his hands gleefully.

Stephen Colbert, The Late Show, Donald Trump
Stephen Colbert, The Late Show, Donald Trump

“Yay! Yay!” he said, blowing a kiss and waving.

“Mr. Trump, Mr. Trump, there is a lot you don’t understand but I never thought one of those thing would be show business.,” the host continued. “Don’t you know I’ve been trying for a year to get you to say my name? And you were very restraining–admirably restrained–but now you did it,” he said, whispering, “I won!”

Stephen Colbert, The Late Show, Donald Trump
Stephen Colbert, The Late Show, Donald Trump
Stephen Colbert, The Late Show, Donald Trump
Stephen Colbert, The Late Show, Donald Trump

On May 1, Colbert had slammed Trump on The Late Show after the president, who has called much of the mainstream media “fake news,” insulted his CBS colleague and Face the Nation host John Dickerson to his face during an on-air interview.

“Sir, you attract more skinheads than free Rogaine,” Colbert had said. “You have more people marching against you than cancer. You talk like a sign-language gorilla that got hit in the head. In fact, the only thing your mouth is good for is being Vladimir Putin‘s c–k holster.”

It was the latter comment, which was censored on TV, that spurred scores of viewers to file complaints with the FCC. In addition, “#FireColbert” trended on Twitter.

“Oh no! Oh…