Machine learning academics are flocking to tech giants and that might be a problem

Machine learning academics are flocking to tech giants and that might be a problem

With the expansion of tech companies like Google, Amazon and Uber, artificial intelligence-based research and products is a growth industry that’s only just getting started.
“It’s five times the salary I can offer,” Paja said.
A respected machine learning academic, she will join the Stanford faculty in 2019, and has also worked at Google Brain.
“I think that the benefits are that academics can build better connections with industry labs and this can mean that there is better access for some academics to industry-level compute and industry-level data resources, but I also think that there are certainly downsides.
“Many schools have faculty that are spending more time in industry and less time in academia.
It also leads to faculty potentially having more conflicts of interest and they’re not necessarily an independent academic entity that’s trying to conduct research independently of any companies’ interests, and now have an affiliation with a company.” A Rising Tide Raises All Ships That being said, Chelsea is quick to note that she does see the benefit of working with companies on a part-time basis.
There are certain situations in machine learning research where, to effectively make progress, you need the large-scale computing and robotic hardware that are only really available in larger tech companies’ R&D labs.
“I hope to make a positive change and a positive impact on the diversity of the community through various outreach efforts.” In 2017, Chelsea co-organised the first BAIR Camp – a week-long program in partnership with AI for All that invited underprivileged high school students from the Bay Area to learn more about the fields of machine learning and artificial intelligence.
An Issue of Demand and Supply Clearly, the scope for and demand for machine learning expertise is only going to continue increasing.
The issue is that, as an area of research and resulting careers, machine learning has to reach a wider set of demographics who are then able to participate in it.

Why Netflix Won’t Be Part of Apple TV

Why Netflix Won’t Be Part of Apple TV

In a second sign of frayed relations between the two companies, Netflix has decided to opt out of the Apple bundle, which will upsell subscriptions to HBO and CBS in addition to its original programming.
We want to have people watch our service — or our content on our service.
The main draw is the bundle, the one-stop service for all kinds of media.
They can also go through Comcast to purchase an HBO or a Netflix subscription.
Hulu has 25 million.
It also explains why HBO (owned by AT&T), Showtime, CBS and Starz could show up on Apple’s service Monday.
Even HBO’s own streaming service, HBO Now, had a slow start until Amazon Prime started marketing it.
Now, it’s a $40 billion business.
CBS, $14 billion.
Netflix, $16 billion.

Retrotechtacular: Nellie The School Computer

Retrotechtacular: Nellie The School Computer

That’s certainly the case for the majority of schools, but not all of them.
In early 1969 the BBC’s Tomorrow’s World visited a school with a computer, and in both technology and culture it was a world away from those schools a decade later that would have received those BBC Micros.
The school in question was The Forrest Grammar School, Winnersh, about 35 miles west of London, and the computer in question was a by-then-obsolete National Elliott 405 mainframe that had been donated four years earlier by the British arm of the food giant Nestlé.
The school referred to it as “Nellie” — a concatenation of the two brand names.
We get a brief look at some of their software too — no operating systems here, everything’s machine code on paper tape — as a teacher plays a reaction timer game and the computer wins at noughts and crosses (tic-tac-toe).
One of them has even written a high-level language interpreter on which younger children solve maths problems.
Of course, a 1950s mainframe with hundreds or thousands of tubes was never a particularly reliable machine, and we see them enacting their failure routine, before finally replacing a faulty delay line.
This is a fascinating watch on so many levels, not least because of its squeaky-clean portrayal of adolescent boys.
This is what teenagers were supposed to be like, but by the late 1960s they must in reality have been anything but that away from the cameras.
In 1974 the Government abolished the grammar school system to create new one-size-fits-all comprehensive schools, one of which the Forrest school duly became.

Hacker Abroad: Visiting Espressif and Surprising Subway Ads

Hacker Abroad: Visiting Espressif and Surprising Subway Ads

Thursday was my final day in Shanghai.
The backstory on how he found his way to the company is truly interesting, as are the stories he shared on some of the legend and lore surrounding the WiFi capable chips the company makes — and the new one whose existence just leaked out this week.
They’ve come a long way since the early days of AT-commands and very limited GPIO on the original ESP8266 offerings.
That said, it was the low cost to adding WiFi to any project made the chip revolutionary.
This explains the AT command firmware that originally shipped with the modules.
That led to the desire for more GPIO, which we saw with the release of the ESP32.
I am fascinated by the story of how Ivan came to be at Espressif.
Seems the company is hiring hardware hackers doing interesting things with their chips (Jeroen Domburg — Sprite_TM — has a similar path to the company) and I like that philosophy!
POV LED Billboard for Your Commute After my visit so Espressif I set out for the subway to make my way back to the airport and happened upon some unique advertising.
The display uses persistence of vision so that to your eye the video ads are moving along with the train, rather than whizzing by it.

Kid Rover Is Six Wheels Of Awesome

Kid Rover Is Six Wheels Of Awesome

[Kris Temmerman] decided to go a little bit farther, however.
The result is a kid rover that’s sure to be the envy of every neighbourhood child for a few zipcodes around.
The chassis is an all-aluminium affair, making TIG welding the perfect choice for the job.
Of course, [Kris] wasn’t content to simply build a basic go-kart or buggy.
This sweet ride is inspired by the rocker-bogie designs of NASA’s Mars rovers, giving it the ride height and flexibility to roam over serious obstacles.
Naturally, there’s six-wheel drive and four-wheel steering to complete the dynamic package.
It’s a beautifully crafted vehicle, and a testament to [Kris]’s machining and design skills.
We can’t wait to see it given a shakedown run on the muddy fields of Belgium.
If you’re eager to start your own rocker-bogie build, NASA’s got the open source designs to get you started.
Video after the break.

Should You Use Hubitat to Automate Your Smarthome?

Should You Use Hubitat to Automate Your Smarthome?

The first step in building a smarthome is often choosing a hub, and there are many options.
Hubitat Is a Powerful Hub for Your Smarthome One thing is still true; there are too many smarthome hubs from which to choose.
What makes it different from most smarthome hubs is its emphasis on local control and incredibly advanced automations.
Most Hubs Are Cloud-Based, But Hubitat Is Local Other major smarthome hubs, like Wink and SmartThings, are cloud-first devices with perhaps some local control added afterward.
Without some support for local control, this doesn’t work when your internet goes down.
Hubitat handles most of the work locally, which offers several benefits.
Because your command doesn’t have to go over the internet and back, you’ll see your lights turn on and off more quickly compared to Wink or Smartthings.
Simply put, Wink and SmartThings aren’t capable of this detailed level of automation.
You’ll also need to learn how those apps and rules work.
Should You Get Hubitat?

Found: York’s First Railway Station

Found: York’s First Railway Station

During construction work on a new housing development in the historic English city of York, crews unearthed the remains of the city’s very first railroad station.
According to Minster FM, a team from LS Archaeology, along with workers from Squibb Demolition, oversaw excavation of a layer of the site containing remnants of the historic structure, including platforms, train turntables, auxiliary buildings, and drainage systems.
The station was built in the 1840s, mostly from wood.
Although the structure represented the vision of the 19th-century architect George Townsend Andrews, a man named George Hudson was the primary force behind the establishment of the station.
Known as “The Railway King,” Hudson was pivotal in framing and developing York as a transportation hub.
With this influence, he was able to route the line heading from Newcastle to London so that it passed through York.
Passengers would no longer simply bypass the walled city—a boon for its economic prospects.
By 1837, Hudson had become the chairman of the York & North Midland Railway Company, and within seven years, he controlled more than 1,000 miles of tracks.
The station eventually became obsolete; a new station was built around 1877.
One of the more pristine artifacts unearthed at the site, a train turntable, used to rotate entire locomotives and cars to go back the way they came or shuffle them off in another direction, will be included in the final landscaping of the new development.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

Ma’in Hot Springs

View all photos Though its salutary effects aren’t as world-famous as those of the Dead Sea, Jordanians have long used the water bubbling and gushing throughout the Hamamat Ma’in (Ma’in Hot Springs) as a natural remedy for all manner of joint pain and skin conditions.
Back when access to these thermal falls was unrestricted and free, locals used to brave the tortuous road from the cities to celebrate holidays with soaking and picnicking.
Surrounded by palm trees and dramatic travertine formations resulting from the interaction of spring water and the atmosphere, Ma’in Hot Springs is a lush canyon paradise in otherwise dry environs.
The entire complex is comprised of 16 springs, which, due to their proximity to a large fault and consequent exposure to subterranean lava fissures, are some of the hottest in Jordan, hovering between 140 and 180 degrees Fahrenheit.
The water is what is known as “fossil groundwater,” and is rich in minerals.
After gurgling up from the ground and crashing over escarpments, the flow eventually joins the Zarqa River, which itself is a tributary of the Jordan River.
While a substantial swath of the hot springs has been cordoned off for guests of a fancy resort built on the premises, everyone can access the public section for an entrance fee.
A number of terraced pools are situated flush against the cliffside and are continuously filled by the waterfalls and springs.
Most people relax and steam in the pools, but it’s also not uncommon to see matriarchs congregated directly under the falls, chatting and laughing as the warm water washes over their heads and shoulders.
These springs have been a revered part of the landscape for millennia.

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